KLS-TM high pressure lip seals for rotary service


After a multi-year test program, Kalsi Engineering is pleased to announce the new KLS high pressure lip seal. These spring-loaded lip seals are for sealing fluid pressure up to 1,000 psi (6.89 MPa) in rotationally unidirectional applications. Testing was performed at a surface speed of 543 feet per minute (2.76 m/s).

The ability to perform well under such high differential pressure is the result of hydrodynamic interfacial lubrication provided by the patented wave geometry on the low pressure end of the seal. Seals with the same general cross-sectional design, but without the waves, failed in a few hours at only 500 psi (3.45 MPa) and a surface speed of 543 feet per minute (2.76 m/s).

When used to retain clean pressurized fluids, only one KLS seal is required, and the seal lubricant can be supplied from a simple unpressurized lubricator. For example, if the seal is located below the bearings, the seal can simply utilize the bearing lubricant.

The ability of lip seals to exclude abrasives diminishes as pressure increases. Because of this, two KLS seals are required to exclude abrasive fluids. In this arrangement, the outboard seal excludes the abrasive fluid, and the inboard seal retains a barrier lubricant between the seals that is balanced to the pressure of the abrasive fluid pressure.

To see if KLS seals are right for your rotary sealing application, call us at 281-240-6500, or contact us by e-mail.

The new KLS seal is a spring-loaded lip seal for differential pressures up to 1,000 psi in applications with unidirectional rotation. The seals have been tested at a rotary surface speed of 543 feet per minute. The seals are constructed in part from extrusion-resistant plastic, and in part from HNBR elastomer. The dynamic lip is loaded against the shaft by a V-spring.
The new KLS seal is a spring-loaded lip seal for differential pressures up to 1,000 psi in applications with unidirectional rotation. The seals have been tested at a rotary surface speed of 543 feet per minute. The seals are constructed in part from extrusion-resistant plastic, and in part from HNBR elastomer. The dynamic lip is loaded against the shaft by a V-spring.