Rotary Seal Blog

University of Houston alumni dinner held in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Kalsi

On the evening of March 31, 2015, the University of Houston held a dinner honoring alumni Manmohan Singh Kalsi, Ph.D. (“Kalsi”), and his wife Marie-Luise Schubert Kalsi, Ph.D. (“Ise”), who are both officers of Kalsi Engineering, Inc. The event was held at the Estess Alumni library in the Honors College Commons area, and was attended […]

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New rotary seal simplifies equipment design

Kalsi Engineering introduced the 673 series Axially Constrained Seal (ACS) in a blog entry in October of last year. We have continued testing this advanced rotary seal in conditions that the 462 series ACS would never be considered for.

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Updated information on high pressure hydraulic swivels and enhanced lubrication seals

The Kalsi Engineering rotary seal handbook has been updated to revision level 21. The most significant revisions involve Chapter C5, “Enhanced Lubrication Kalsi Seals” and Chapter E2, “Using Kalsi Seals in hydraulic swivels”. Minor technical, editorial and/or cosmetic changes were also made to Chapters A2, A3, B1, and D8, and Appendices 2 and 4.

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Mr. and Mrs. Kalsi establish an endowed professorship at the University of Houston

The current issue of the University of Houston Momentum magazine announces a new endowed professorship in the mechanical engineering department that is sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Kalsi of Kalsi Engineering, Inc. The “Dr. Manmohan Singh Kalsi and Dr. Marie-Luise Schubert Kalsi Endowed Professorship” was established in 2014 in honor of Professor Gabriel […]

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A video tour of our seal testing lab

We have posted a new 3.3-minute video tour of our rotary seal test lab to our YouTube channel. The video explains several types of test fixtures we use to evaluate new seal materials, geometries, and hardware arrangements. In an average year, we perform over 12,000 hours of rotary testing. This significant investment in testing sets […]

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7,500 psi 1,000 hour rotary seal test

The high pressure washpipe assemblies used in oil well drilling are subjected to difficult sealing conditions. A conventional washpipe packing fails in only a few hours when subjected to 6,000 psi or greater mud pressure. Replacement of the failed washpipe packing assembly typically requires the bottom hole assembly to be tripped back into the casing […]

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5,000 psi seal test directed at rotating cement head operating conditions

One of the critical steps in completing an oil or gas well is pumping cement into the well annulus that is located between the casing and the bore of the well. Among other things, cementing provides zonal isolation, and provides support and protection for the casing. Rotation of the casing string during the cementing job […]

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A new chapter on side port swivels has been added to our rotary seal handbook

A new chapter titled “Using Kalsi Seals in side port swivels” has been added in the Application Engineering section of our rotary seal handbook. This new, well-illustrated chapter describes the best practices for designing high pressure side port swivels for use with Kalsi-brand rotary shaft seals. The suggested swivel design incorporates Kalsi Engineering’s patented floating […]

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40 day 5,000 psi rotary seal test with 0.010” runout

Kalsi Engineering is pleased to announce a new benchmark in high pressure rotary seal performance. A pair of PN 655-4-114 Extra Wide Enhanced Lubrication Seals have been tested at 5,000 psi for 40 days against a 2.75” (69.85mm) shaft rotating at 252 ft/minute (1.28 m/s) with 0.010” (0.25mm) dynamic runout. This is the most severe […]

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A new advancement in axially constrained seals

After several years of development, Kalsi Engineering is pleased to announce a new line of 0.335” (8.51mm) cross-section axially constrained seals: The 673 series. This new series offers improved abrasive exclusion performance over 462 series seals in conditions where the pressure of the abrasive environment is greater than the pressure of the seal lubricant. It […]

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